A considerable amount of the information circulated in the hard right is undocumented rumor and irrational conspiracist theory. Print sources frequently cited as having "proof" of the conspiracy include the New American magazine from the reactionary John Birch Society; a reactionary newsletter, The American Sentinel; the Spotlight newspaper from the antisemitic Liberty Lobby; and Executive Intelligence Review (EIR) and The New Federalist from the neofascist Lyndon LaRouche movement.

Major purveyors of right-wing conspiracist scapegoating in recent years have included radio personalities Tom Valentine, Chuck Harder, Craig Hulet, Mark Koernke, John Stadtmiller, Norm Resnick, William Cooper, Linda Thompson, Jack McLamb, Tom Donahue, and Bo Gritz. Sometimes right–wing populist radio shows introduce hard right ideologues as innocuous experts. On his “For The People” syndicated program, Chuck Harder once used notorious antisemite Eustace Mullins as an expert on the Federal Reserve. Harder’s newspaper, tied to the radio program, sold several Mullins’ books––including one claiming a Rothschild family Jewish banking conspiracy––for over a year. Yet Mullins did not sound antisemitic on the radio program. Harder stopped promoting Mullins after a listener documented Mullin's beliefs.

Some conspiracism is based on classic white supremacist and segregationist legal arguments or allegations of secret plots by international Jewish bankers traced back to the hoax text, The Protocols of the Secret Elders of Zion. Most of the contemporary conspiracist allegations in the US are variations on the themes propounded in the late 1700's by John Robison, Proofs of a Conspiracy and Abbe Augustin Barruel, Memoirs Illustrating the History of Jacobinism, which claimed that the Illuminati society had subverted the Freemasons into a conspiracy to undermine church and state and create a one-world government.

The armed militia movement formed as the militant wing of the patriot movement following the government’s excessive use of force against the Weaver family in Idaho and the Branch Davidians in Texas. Patriots and militia members have an anti–government agenda laced with paranoid-sounding conspiracist theories, many of which echo apocalyptic millenialism of Christian fundamentalists. Persons in the patriot movement fear impending attack by government or UN troops and the establishment of a dictatorship as part of the New World Order. They distrust all mainstream media. The patriot movement made aggressive use of alternative electronic media such as fax networks, radio talk shows, shortwave radio, and online computer telecommunications.

The most alarmist attacks on President Bill Clinton originated in hard right alternative media. For instance, the publisher of The American Sentinel put out a booklet titled The Clinton Clique by long-time Birch Society stalwarts Larry Abraham and William P. Hoar detailing the JBS theory that Clinton was part of the Anglo-American conspiracy supposedly ruled through the Council on Foreign Relations and the Trilateral Commission. The JBS itself has been promoting bulk distribution of one issue of its magazine, The New American, with a cover story and special report on the "Conspiracy for Global Control" linking Clinton to the purported Council on Foreign Relations conspiracy.

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